Wedding History and Traditions

On her wedding day, the bride will be the centre of attention and not able to hide from anyone. Before her wedding day however, it is said to be bad luck for the bride and groom to see each other. The bride is also 'hidden' at the wedding ceremony until the vows have been said and her veil is lifted.

Few modern brides follow these traditions in favour of fresher looking photos taken before the wedding. Here are the origins of some well known wedding traditions so you can decide for yourself whether you want to keep to tradition or start your own.

In times gone by it was customary for the bride and groom to accompany each other to the church and it is only in recent history that it has become bad luck for them to see each other before the wedding. This is said to be because the build up to the unveiling of the bride at the altar helps the groom avoid cold feet. Another reason is that if the bride sees anyone before her wedding she risks passing on bad luck to them as those about to be married are seen as being in an in between stage associated with uncertainty.

So strong is this belief in some couples that even with so many living together before marriage, they still insist on parting no later than midnight the night before their wedding. This belief also stretches to the bride's wedding dress which cannot be seen by the groom even in the bride isn't wearing it.

In the days of arranged marriages, the bridal veil was a symbol to the groom of virginal humility. Yellow was once the colour for weddings and the bride wore a yellow veil which covered her from head to toe from the time she left her mother's house, until her groom 'unveiled' her on her wedding night. Again, as a symbol of purity, the veil is likened to that which the Virgin Mary is often portrayed in.

You may choose to follow these traditions depending on whether you believe in the purity of the Virgin Mary or you may just like the symbolism of being unveiled to your groom.

We hope you found our traditional wedding article(s) useful. Please feel free to contact us with your feedback or any enquiries.